I'm a Director. I tell stories on screens.This is what caught my interest today.You can see what I'm up to at www.chrisgaffey.com Twitter @chrisgaffey

2nd September 2014

Photoset

There is no standard design for the chequered flag. 
Though now a universally recognised signal for the start and finish of a race, the exact origins of its use are unknown.
Historian Fred Egloff traces the flag’s introduction to a Sidney Waldon, an employee of the Packard Motor Car Company, who in 1906 devised the  highly visibile flag to mark “checkpoints” along the Glidden Tour - US endurance rally event of several hundred miles (held 1902 -1913) named after Charles J Glidden, a financier and automobile enthusiast who presented the American Automobile Association with the first winner’s trophy.
The earliest known photographic record of a chequered flag being used to end a race is the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup held in Long Island, New York.

Tagged: chequeredflagdesignblack and whitecontrastphotographyracingautomobileHistorysymbolracechampionwinnerLong islandcheckvisibility

1st September 2014

Photoset with 5 notes

Triumph Bonneville T100 Paul Smith signature series. Nine one-off paint schemes were created - two designs put into limited production of 50, individually numbered and authenticated.

Tagged: Paul SmithbritishdesignerTriumphmotorcycledesignpop artbonneville

30th August 2014

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Limited Edition Paul Smith Leica X2.

Tagged: LeicacameraPaul SmithdesignerBritishGermancollaborationcolourvividluxuryleather

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from moviebarcode with 391 notes

Blade Runner (1982)

Blade Runner (1982)

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29th August 2014

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29th August 2014

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29th August 2014

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29th August 2014

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29th August 2014

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29th August 2014

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Paul Smith signature stripe Mini. Photo Nick Dunmur

Tagged: stripespaul smithdesignminibritish

28th August 2014

Photoset with 4 notes

 "I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet" a boutique selling military memorabilia and antique uniforms opened in London’s Portobello Road in 1966. 

Apparently, one morning John Lennon and Mick Jagger walked in. Jagger bought a red Grenadier guardsman drummer’s jacket to wear on the TV show Ready! Steady! Go! where the Stones performed ‘Under My Thumb’ and ‘Paint it Black’.  The next morning there was a line outside and they sold everything in the shop by lunchtime.
 
Eric Clapton was a customer, as was former soldier Jimi Hendrix, who famously purchased an antique 1850s hussar’s jacket.
The popularity of its anti-establishment ironic victorian nostalgia spread.
In September 1966 The Times reported that a ‘Muswell Hill youth’ had been conditionally discharged after being stopped wearing a Scots Guards tunic. 
By 1967 IWLKV had outlets in Carnaby Street and Wardour Street.

Tagged: FashionMenswearmilitaryuniformsLondonswinging sixties1960scarnaby streetvintage

26th August 2014

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4 million copies of James Montgomery Flagg’s Uncle Sam poster were printed by the US during WW1. 
Designed in 1917, it was inspired by a 1914 British recruitment poster featuring Lord Kitchener in a similar pose.
Flagg apparently used his own face as a basis for Uncle Sam, he said later, simply to avoid the trouble of arranging for a model. 
Ft. Knox Kentucky has a parade field named and dedicated to the artist called Flagg Field.

4 million copies of James Montgomery Flagg’s Uncle Sam poster were printed by the US during WW1. 

Designed in 1917, it was inspired by a 1914 British recruitment poster featuring Lord Kitchener in a similar pose.

Flagg apparently used his own face as a basis for Uncle Sam, he said later, simply to avoid the trouble of arranging for a model. 

Ft. Knox Kentucky has a parade field named and dedicated to the artist called Flagg Field.

Tagged: Uncle Samgraphic designilustrationillustratorJames Mongomery FlaggposterPoster artWorld War OneWWIWarmilitaryhistoryUS Army

26th August 2014

Photoset with 15 notes

KITCHENER’S POINTING FINGER.

The recruitment poster featuring the British minister Lord Kitchener is a defining image of the first World War.  His provocative finger aimed directly at the viewer remains recognisable and imitated, 100 years after its design. 

Most people assume the image owes its fame to a government campaign, but as few as 10,000 copies were printed and only a handful of original copies survive today.  

It was in fact initially created as a front cover design for the London Opinion magazine on 5 September 1914, by professional illustrator Alfred Leete. In response to requests for reproductions, the magazine offered postcard-sized copies. The design was produced as a poster shortly afterwards with the headline amended to (Kitchener) “Wants You”. 

The authorities had anticipated that an image of the popular Lord Kitchener would be good for recruiting.  But the official Parliamentary Recruitment Committee poster used an uninspiring long-winded quote and a far less dramatic image of the field marshal.  Although it received a print-run 15 times greater than Leete’s design, it’s now largely forgotten.

Leete was a renowned cartoonist who understood the importance of simplicity in communicating with the public. 

His illustration carefully manipulated Kitchener’s appearance, correcting his squint, fixing a stern gaze and enlarging and darkening his moustache making him younger. The pointing finger singles out the individual, placing you under an obligation to respond.

Horatio Kitchener was born in Ireland 1850 and educated at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich. He took part in the operation to relieve General Gordon at Khartoum and went on to be appointed governor general of eastern Sudan, commander in chief of India and proconsul of Egypt. When war broke out, he reluctantly accepted the appointment of secretary of state for war. He was credited with great foresight in recognising that WW1 would last several years and require a large army, but his disputes with political and military figures of the time are now obscured by Leete’s evocative caricature.

The Statesman was uneasy about his image use in recruitment campaigns. He believed it should be the monarch inspiring people to sign up and insisted that the words “God Save the King” were included.

Lord Kitchener was killed 5 June 1916 in the sinking of HMS Hampshire, as he journeyed to Russia.

His iconic finger points on. 

Tagged: World War OneKitchenergraphic designposter articonicIllustrationWW1HistoryBritainWarcharactermoustacheillustratorAlfred Leetepostermilitarydesign

25th August 2014

Photoset with 6 notes

PAISLEY pattern features the boteh or butaan organic droplet-shaped motif of ancient Persian and Indian origin. It is known to have been used to decorate royal regalia, crowns and court garments in Iran as far back as the Sassanid Dynasty.

The colourful twisted-teardrop design first became popular in the West during the 18th and 19th centuries, following imports the British East India Company.

Soldiers returning from the colonies brought home Kashmir wool shawls and the design was imitated, particularly by the weavers of Paisley, Scotland who became its foremost producer by adapting their hand-looms which allowed them to work in more colours than their competition. The pattern consequently took on the name of the town.  

Paisley went on to become a major manufacturer of printed textiles which brought down the price of the costly design and further increased its appeal.

Paisley was re-popularised during the Summer of Love and became heavily identified with psychedelic style and the interest in Indian spirituality and culture following The Beatles pilgrimage to Rishikesh in 1968. 

Tagged: DesignPaisleyIndiaPersiaTextilesThe beatlessummer of love1960scolourmanufacturinginspiration1968cultureyouth culture

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from The Swinging Sixties with 304 notes

The Yardbirds live in Santa Barbara. 1968 Poster

The Yardbirds live in Santa Barbara. 1968 Poster

Tagged: poster artgraphic designillustrationphysodeliccalifornia

Source: savetheflower-1967