I'm a Director. I tell stories on screens.This is what caught my interest today.You can see what I'm up to at www.chrisgaffey.com Twitter @chrisgaffey

18th August 2014

Photoset

Pretty Green Vintage Paisley silk scarves

Tagged: paisleyprintcolourpsychedelicmenswear

15th August 2014

Photo with 209 notes

John Lennon’s Rolls Royce Phantom V painted by The Fool 1967 and George Harrison’s Magical Mystery Tour Mini Cooper

John Lennon’s Rolls Royce Phantom V painted by The Fool 1967 and George Harrison’s Magical Mystery Tour Mini Cooper

Tagged: The beatlesrollsroyceMiniphysodelicpaintjobcustomautomobileBritishBritain1960smagical mystery tourjohn lennongeorge harrison

15th August 2014

Photo with 2 notes

The Connoiseur  Norman Rockwell
Oil on canvas. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, January 13, 1962.

In 1961 Rockwell temporarily transformed his studio into an abstract expressionist’s workplace in order to paint The Connoisseur.  

Fascinated by modern and abstract art, the artist designed a cover in which he could acknowledge his appreciation of the genre, but leave the interpretation of the character’s reaction to the viewer.

Rockwell constructed his drip painting similar to the work of Jackson Pollock. But rather than paint the connoisseur and then surround him with the abstract image, Rockwell produced the abstract as a separate and complete image so he was able to position a cutout of painting of the man to test the final effect. He then combined the images in a final painting.

Rockwell submitted a section of his sample abstract painting to an exhibition at the Cooperstown Art Association in New York, signing the canvas with a pseudonym. It took first prize. 

The original painting is now in the private collection of Mr Steven Spielberg. 


 

The Connoiseur  Norman Rockwell

Oil on canvas. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, January 13, 1962.

In 1961 Rockwell temporarily transformed his studio into an abstract expressionist’s workplace in order to paint The Connoisseur.  

Fascinated by modern and abstract art, the artist designed a cover in which he could acknowledge his appreciation of the genre, but leave the interpretation of the character’s reaction to the viewer.

Rockwell constructed his drip painting similar to the work of Jackson Pollock. But rather than paint the connoisseur and then surround him with the abstract image, Rockwell produced the abstract as a separate and complete image so he was able to position a cutout of painting of the man to test the final effect. He then combined the images in a final painting.

Rockwell submitted a section of his sample abstract painting to an exhibition at the Cooperstown Art Association in New York, signing the canvas with a pseudonym. It took first prize. 

The original painting is now in the private collection of Mr Steven Spielberg. 

 

Tagged: norman rockwellAbstractExpressionistpaintingpainterartIllustrationmagazine1960sjackson pollocksteven spielbergsaturday evening post

15th August 2014

Video

Tagged: TitlesTypographyart directionmodel makingpracticalhandmade

15th August 2014

Video

Tagged: Paint

15th August 2014

Photoset with 51 notes

The high flying Mr Kite
On 31st January 1967, whilst the Beatles were in Sevenoaks, Kent, filming the promotional videos for ‘Penny Lane’ and ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ John Lennon wandered into an antiques shop on his lunch break and bought a framed Victorian poster, announcing Pablo Fanque’s Circus appearance in Rochdale, February 1843.
Lennon hung the poster in his music room at his home in Weybridge where it inspired him and McCartney to write Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite , one of the most musically complex songs on Sgt. Pepper.
It was recorded on 17th February 1967 with overdubs on 20th February and 28th, 29th and 31st March. Lennon told producer George Martin that the track needed to have a “carnival atmosphere” and he wanted ”to smell the sawdust on the floor.”  Multiple recordings of fairground organs and sound effects were spliced together but after a great deal of unsuccessful experimentation to achieve a tremendous chaotic effect, Martin told recording engineer Geoff Emerick to chop the tape into pieces with scissors, throw them up in the air and re-assemble them at random!
Lennon later said ”It was time to write. AndI had to write quick because otherwise it wouldn’t have been on the album. I knocked off A Day In The Life, or my section of it, and whatever we were talking about, Mr Kite, or something like that.”  ”The whole song is from a Victorian poster, which I bought in a junk shop. It is so cosmically beautiful. Everything in the song is from that poster, except the horse wasn’t called Henry. “
The BBC banned the song from broadcast because they believed the words Henry and Horse were a reference to slang terms for Heroine.
Mr. William Kite, son of circus owner James Kite, worked for Pablo Fanque from 1843 to 1845. Fanque, was Britain’s first black circus owner.  
Mr. John Henderson was  a wire-walker, equestrian, trampoline artist and clown. Although the poster makes no mention of “Hendersons” plural, Mr Henderson did indeed perform with his wife Agnes, although how Lennon knew this I’ve no idea.
Inspired.

Tagged: john lennonMr Kitesgt. pepper's lonely hearts club band1967songwritercircusposter artTypographyThe beatlesinspiration

13th August 2014

Photo reblogged from The Weird Wide Web with 260 notes

Tagged: pop artroy lichtensteinscrolling

13th August 2014

Photoset with 13 notes

WHAAM! 1963

Roy Lichtenstein’s 4-meter-wide canvas and his inspiration - a page from the DC comic All-American Men of War #89 (Feb 1962) - and his composite sketch, replacing the original attacking plane with a sharper angle version, taken from a panel in the following issue, All American Men Of War #90, from the story ‘Wingmate of Doom’.

Few people know that the pilot firing the missiles is a Native American, ‘Johnny Cloud, Navaho Ace’ who received predictions of his future through smoke pictures.

Tagged: pop artroy lichtensteinWHAAM!aviationcomic art

13th August 2014

Photoset with 8 notes

Detail of Roy Fox Lichtenstein’s Drowning Girl , 1963

Tagged: pop artroy lichtensteincomic art1960smuseum of modern artBen-Day Dots

13th August 2014

Photo with 2 notes

STANLEY ROAD 2005 10th Anniversary Edition
Peter Blake

STANLEY ROAD 2005 10th Anniversary Edition

Peter Blake

Tagged: pop artpaul wellerpeter blakebritaingraphic design

13th August 2014

Photo

STANLEY ROAD Paul Weller 1995 by Peter Blake 

STANLEY ROAD Paul Weller 1995 by Peter Blake 

Tagged: peter blakepop artpaul wellerbritainmods

13th August 2014

Photo with 1 note

Secret Love by Sir Peter Blake

Secret Love by Sir Peter Blake

Tagged: pop artpeter blakecolourdoris day

13th August 2014

Photo

TARZAN 1967 Peter Blake

TARZAN 1967 Peter Blake

Tagged: pop arttarzancolour

12th August 2014

Photoset with 2 notes

THE BEACH BOYS  1964  Silkscreen print by Peter Blake

Tagged: pop art1964beach boyspeter blaketype

12th August 2014

Photo with 1 note

TUESDAY 
1961 Peter Blake
The title is a reference to Tuesday Weld, the teenage film star sex symbol who received a Golden Globe for most promising newcomer in 1960.The source of the images was probably Playboy Magazine. 
Blake often used letters from Victorian word games in his work, these were the common kind found screwed to a door but the artist was unable to obtain an ‘A’ and used a ‘V’ instead upside down. 
The carpentry, wood relief, real letters, stripes painted in house enamel… no idea what it all means. But it’s interesting.

Maybe it’s a calendar. 

TUESDAY

1961 Peter Blake

The title is a reference to Tuesday Weld, the teenage film star sex symbol who received a Golden Globe for most promising newcomer in 1960.
The source of the images was probably Playboy Magazine. 
Blake often used letters from Victorian word games in his work, these were the common kind found screwed to a door but the artist was unable to obtain an ‘A’ and used a ‘V’ instead upside down. 
The carpentry, wood relief, real letters, stripes painted in house enamel… no idea what it all means. But it’s interesting.
Maybe it’s a calendar. 

Tagged: peter blakepop artTuesday1960s